How to Germinate Peach Pits (and Why You Should)

germinate peach pits

Save money by growing your own peach trees from seeds. It’s amazingly easy! My video on how to germinate peach pits has almost 40,000 views since I posted it back in July of last year. Watch it below.

Since posting that instructional video, I have received a lot of comments and emails from people thanking me for showing them how to grow their own peaches from seeds.

Recently, my friend Amanda sent these two pictures of her peach-sprouting success.

germinate peach pit germinate peach pit

How Do You Germinate Peach Pits?

Some years ago, I discovered in some dusty corner of the internet that peach pits require cold stratification to germinate. Cold stratification is a technique used to simulate real-world conditions that a seed would get outdoors after a frozen winter, which then gives way to a warm, wet spring. There are six methods of cold stratification to choose from: cold water soaking, refrigeration, fall planting, winter/solstice sowing, outdoor treatment, and snow planting.

I put this knowledge to the test with great success, starting about 50 peach pits I found beneath an abandoned and squirrel-ravaged Tropic Beauty peach growing a few miles from my old place in North Florida.

germinate peach pit

I did this experiment despite the fact that there are hordes of small-minded gardeners, who take great pleasure in lecturing everyone about the utter worthlessness of starting fruit trees from seed.

These people are wrong.

Here’s a video I did showing some of my seed-grown peach trees in fruit:

And here are two pictures of some of the delicious fruit I got as a result of germinating peach pits in my very own refrigerator:

germinate peach pit germinate peach pit

In their SECOND year, my two seedling peach trees produced about five gallons of fruit. They continued to massively outproduce the grafted peach trees I planted before them, plus they grew with more vigor.

Growing fruit trees from seed isn’t a dumb thing to do. It’s a great thing to do, and a YUGE, high energy, too. Check out this video on how I germinated other fruit trees from seed!

Sometimes the “experts” aren’t necessarily correct. They’re just people who say things adamantly because they’ve heard other people say them.

Heck with that.

Germinate peach pits and you get free fruit trees. Easy! The same method works for plums and cherries, too. And if that’s not enough, you can read about sprouting avocados here.

Finally, here’s how you germinate peach pits, cartoon-style:

germinate peach pit

 

Thanks for the pictures, Amanda, and may your peaches grow and produce abundantly. And let us know how your germination experiments go! We’d love to hear from you. Put your comments below.

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David The Good


Contributor

David The Good is a Grow Network Change Maker, a gardening expert, and the author of four books you can find on Amazon: Compost Everything: The Good Guide to Extreme Composting, Grow or Die: The Good Guide to Survival Gardening, Totally Crazy Easy Florida Gardening, and Create Your Own Florida Food Forest. His upcoming book Push the Zone explores growing tropical edibles outside the tropics. Find fresh gardening inspiration at his website http://www.TheSurvivalGardener.com and be sure to follow his popular YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/user/davidthegood.


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29 Comments
  • Red

    How long after you started them from seeds did you have your first harvest?

    • Red

      I kinda find it hard to believe that the second yr they produced gallons of fruit. How much fruit per seedling?

      • Deedee

        Planting a young peach tree or a peach pit will not give you fruit the first year. You must wait 3 to 4 years before it starts to produce fruit, notes the Alabama Cooperative Extension System. Before this time, the tree will be too small to support full-sized, harvestable fruit. During the first, nonproductive years the tree’s energy is concentrated on the tree’s growth.

  • Sherilyn Thompson

    David will peaches and other “temperate zone” fruit trees grow in the tropics? What about nut trees like pecans or walnuts? I currently live in Nicaragua and am wondering what fruit trees would grow here. My husband loves cherries, and I love peaches, but I didn’t think they would grow here. Am I wrong, or right about that?

  • Gina

    Sherilyn,
    David mentions a variety of peach called “tropic beauty” in the article that he grew in Florida. That might work for you. Cherries are doubtful, but do your own research, I might be wrong. However, why not take advantage of the environment you’re in and grow tropical fruits and nuts? You can grow mangoes (yum!), papayas, bananas, pineapples, star fruit, passion fruit, oranges and lemons and other citrus, avocados, dates, figs, acerola cherries, acai and other tropical “super fruits”, coconuts, cashews, macadamia nuts, etc. All the things temperate zone gardeners wish they could grow. As the saying goes, “bloom where you’re planted.”

    • Gina

      I almost forgot, you can also grow Theobroma cacao, otherwise known as chocolate trees. You can grow your own chocolate! What could be better than that? Your own coffee, too if you’re into coffee.

  • Mary

    David, I live in Dallas Texas and my son keeps asking me to get him a cherry tree. I am using your instructions on some other organic stone fruits but the type of cherry that might possibly do well here isn’t anything like what we get in the stores. Do you know of a source for the seeds?

    • Dakota

      Someone’s yard would probably be the best place. Look on Facebook for Dallas Garden clubs and such and ask if anyone can give you a few cherries next time they have some. Try calling Womack’s Nursery in DeLeon for trees. Probably no warranty on cherry trees. You will want one with low chill requirement, probably sour cherry. My friend used to have a small cherry tree/bush in his backyard in Dallas that had small very tart cherries they made jelly with, but he moved.

  • Joni Nuernberg

    Any ideas on growing in a state like Wisconsin where we have true 4 seasons?

  • Diane Hopkins

    So, do you crack the pit open or not?

    Thanks!
    ; 0 )

  • Sarah

    I compost everything in my kitchen and the peach seed seem not to compost very well. I have gotten so many peach seedlings in my backyard. I left one on the same place it sprouted last year. This summer it produced many sizeable sweet white peaches. Yum!

  • Debbie

    The idea sounds great, but here in hardiness zone 4a peaches, apricots, and sweet cherries are fruits that will not survive without good winter protection. I had a peach tree once that lasted through one season but died the next, even though it was well covered. The only way I might make this work would be to buy some locally grown varieties the next time I travel far enough south to where they actually will grow and, if the pits sprout, try to grow them in a mini-greenhouse. I may try plums though.

    • Doug

      I have 2 peach trees in upstate New York. They produce very well most years after 4th season . Plums also . But all fruit trees up here depend if we get frost after blossoming.

  • Natalie Hackett

    Does it work the same for plums, apricots and nectorines too ??

  • Michael dwight

    Thanks Im gonna give it a shot !!

  • Debbie

    I just came back from my nephew’s house with a bag full of peaches of an unknown variety that were growing well in zone 5b (They came with the house he bought). I am in 4a, so it’s time to try pushing the zone. I look forward to seeing how well they will sprout and grow here with some winter protection.

  • Lyn

    I live in the interior of Alaska, winter temps can get down to -50 to -60 for days at a time. Will this work if the plants were in pots? Will they still give fruit?

    • Tammy

      You should definitely plant the pot in the ground over the cold season. I’ve killed my share of plants leaving them in pots over the winter.

  • Tim Shuteran

    Have you had any issues with peaches from orchards that use almonds as pollinators? If the accidental crosses don’t produce good peaches, do they typically produce good almonds?

  • I need to known that peach pit can germinate in Nigeria
    Please

  • Step1 I need to know will
    Is ten day put on sunshine
    Or

  • Sally

    David, thanks for the awesome idea. Our little peach tree’s small harvest is just about ready, and now I know what to do with the pits. 🙂

    Loved your cartoon tutorial too! LOL

  • Jeffery Copas

    I am going to try the peach seed thing and I hope it works for me too.I have a Apple tree I started from seeds of a Apple that I ate .
    Thank you for the information.

  • Carol

    David, I grew my first peach tree from a seed pit. I just dropped a pit in the ground late fall 2 yrs ago. I was surprised in the Spring of the first year it had grown rapidly to about 2 ft. By the end of the season it had grown to almost 5ft. This year(2nd yr) it had grown to over 8ft and still growing and amazingly it bore fruit already. Sweet nice size peaches. Can’t wait until next year. Only one problem, do you spray the tree to keep the insects from boring into the peaches. I found little black specks on them then some small holes which ended up a small worm which went straight to the core.. if you spray them do you have any suggestions.

  • JP

    Can this be done in Northern states?

  • Bethany

    Thank u . I brought home to ms .from wa lot of peach seeds.

  • jaque

    I am confused. In the video you planted the pit with the kernel in them. In the cartoon the kernel is removed from the casing and you plant the casing not the kernel. Doesn’t the plant grow from the kernel and not the hard casing or am I wrong?

  • Julie

    do you plant the cracked pit or the kernel? if the pit is to be planted, why take the kernel out? I can’t wait to do this!! Love peaches. Thanks so.much
    Julie

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